Monitoring app for deteriorating eye, retinal conditions

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://www.healthtechzone.com/topics/healthcare/articles/2013/04/12/334081-new-fda-approved-myvisiontrack-medical-device-provides-hope.htm

Using a proprietary patented shape discrimination hyperacuity (SDH) test, myVisionTrack enables patients to regularly assess their vision function. myVisionTrack stores test results, tracks disease progression and can automatically alert a healthcare provider if it suspects significant deterioration of visual function in the patient. Clinical studies demonstrate that myVisionTrack’s shape discrimination hyperacuity test has comparable or higher sensitivity and specificity compared to clinically available standard visual function tests for detecting advanced maculopathy from high-risk moderate maculopathy.

Cord-free hospital medical monitors

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://ajw.asahi.com/article/economy/technology/AJ201304120065

Hospital patients may no longer need to be hooked up to a tangle of wires, thanks to new technology developed by Fujitsu Ltd. The device enables cord-free monitoring through radio-wave transmission of electrocardiograms, blood pressure and other data from sensors attached to patients’ bodies.

A transmitter mounted on each sensor sends readings to a receiver adjacent to the bed, which will be connected to a dedicated monitor or personal computer. The data transmission utilizes the “medical body area network” (mBAN), a telecommunications standard for medical equipment. The radio waves only have a transmission range of 5 meters and do not interfere with pacemakers or other medical equipment, Fujitsu officials said.

fMRI differentiates physical from emotional pain

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-sci-pain-measure-fmri-20130409,0,5200467.story

A group of scientists at the University of Michigan have succeeded in using functional magnetic resonance imaging to tease apart the brain’s consistent response to physical pain from its very similar response to emotional pain. The result is a moving picture of physical pain that allowed the researchers to predict with remarkable accuracy whether the individual whose brain they were watching was experiencing intense physical pain, the sensation of a warm spot on his arm, or the sting of social rejection.

Babies’ brains to be mapped in the womb and after birth

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21880017

The study – known as the Developing Human Connectome Project – hopes to look at more than 1,500 babies, studying many aspects of their neurological development.

By examining the brains of babies while they are still growing in the womb, as well as those born prematurely and at full term, the scientists will try to define baselines of normal development and investigate how these may be affected by problems around birth.

Central to this project are advanced MRI scanning techniques, which the scientists say are able to pick up on details of the growing brain that have been difficult to capture until now.

Obamacare positions mHealth as a remedy for chronic hospital readmissions

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=affordable-care-act-technology

The Obama administration introduced the ACA in 2010 to move health care away from a fee-for-service model to one that promotes preventative care and overall wellness. Beginning this October the ACA will reinforce this approach by penalizing hospitals with chronic readmission problems by cutting Medicare reimbursement payments to those facilities. This policy initially targets patients suffering from three health conditions—heart failure, pneumonia and heart attack—but penalties will apply to additional conditions beginning in 2015.

Remote health monitoring systems have patients wear sensors that wirelessly collect, store, analyze and transmit health-related data. One of several approaches is the Wearable Wellness System from Italy’s Smartex, essentially an undershirt with embedded sensors and a processor that can monitor heart and respiration rates. Although not as fashionable, the Metria wearable sensor, from Vancive Medical Technologies, a medical division of Avery Dennison, can be adhesively bound to the body to measure heart rate, respiration, sleep duration and activity levels.

Medical monitoring via webcam

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/03/remote-monitoring

A team of researchers at Xerox is working on technology that would allow doctors to obtain patients’ vital signs using a simple webcam. Already, the team is testing use of the technology to monitor the pulse rate of premature babies and to track irregular heartbeats in patients suffering from arrhythmia.

By applying further signal-processing algorithms to the images, doctors can get a read-out of a baby’s blood-oxygen level. If the camera can see more than one part of the child it can also measure that child’s blood pressure. It does this by recording the time each pulse caused by the heartbeat takes to arrive in different arteries.

Sensors and mobile technology for asthma management

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://techcrunch.com/2013/04/05/asthmapolis-wants-to-hack-the-inhaler-and-help-26-million-americans-better-track-and-manage-their-asthma/

Asthmapolis uses a novel combination of smartphone applications and snap-on inhaler sensors that track when and how often patients use their inhaled medications. The geomedicine platform, available in both English and Spanish, is designed to help individuals with their daily preventive medications, reveal insights about their use of rescue medications and provide personalized feedback to improve their ability to successfully manage the disease.

3-D printer builds synthetic tissues

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

http://phys.org/news/2013-04-d-printer-synthetic-tissues.html

Oxford University scientists have created a custom-built programmable 3D printer that can create materials with several of the properties of living tissues.

The new type of material consists of thousands of connected water droplets, encapsulated within lipid films, which can perform some of the functions of the cells inside our bodies. These printed ‘droplet networks’ could be the building blocks of a new kind of technology for delivering drugs to places where they are needed and potentially one day replacing or interfacing with damaged human tissues. Because droplet networks are entirely synthetic, have no genome and do not replicate, they avoid some of the problems associated with other approaches to creating artificial tissues – such as those that use stem cells.

Sensors detect diabetic foot ulcers early

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Two new sensor-based early detection tools for diabetic foot ulcers are being developed.

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/383644/The-alarm-that-can-save-limbs

Orpyx Medical Technologies has developed a wristwatch and shoe insert.  An insole is designed to support the foot, with three separate foam layers. Eight tiny electronic sensors are packed in the top of the insole so that they rest against thesurface of the foot once the shoe has been put on. These sensors are programmed to detect when pressure exceeds predetermined levels at certain points of the foot that are most susceptible to ulcers. Once they do, they wirelessly transmit a warning to the watch, which immediately sounds an alert.

http://www.podimetrics.com

Cambridge based Podimetrics is developing a home-monitoring bath mat with sensors that record changes in blood flow patterns when a diabetic patient steps on the mat. The sensors scan the foot to collect data about blood flow and send the data to the cloud to be stored and analyzed. The company’s algorithms look at that data in two ways: longitudinally over time and comparatively between the left and right foot to detect patterns that may indicate the presence of a developing ulcer. When the algorithms detect a pre-ulcer, an alert is sent to the patient and his doctor prompting an intervention early on.