Apps aim to detect skin cancer

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http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323783704578245973988828066.html#

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center tested four apps to analyze images of 188 moles, including 60 melanomas. All of these moles were pre-evaluated by a dermatologist.

The best-performing app forwarded the images to board-certified dermatologists to review at cost of $5 per mole, and claims to be accurate 98% of the time.  Some are skeptical.  We are sure that we will soon see a proliferation of early, at home detection apps.

Health focused sensor technology dominated CES

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/michael-yang/health-devices_b_2424812.html

The “sensorization” of CES was obvious.  Which technologies are meaningful, and which are simply stylish?  The health monitoring sector is set to grow exponentially in 2013. It’s important to understand the science behind the gadgets.  ApplySci, the crowdfunding platform, is committed to bringing you peer reviewed, life enhancing, sensor based mobile health monitoring technology.  And the ApplySci blog will regularly review this technology.  We welcome your input.

Radiation in space might harm the brains of astronauts

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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/50334586/ns/technology_and_science-space/#.UOK82ak2_zI

“This study shows for the first time that exposure to radiation levels equivalent to a mission to Mars could produce cognitive problems and speed up changes in the brain that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease,” study author Kerry O’Banion, a neuroscientist at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in a statement.

Genetically modified virus produces heart’s own pacemaker in animals

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http://technorati.com/technology/article/viruses-helped-to-make-the-natural/

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute had another idea. They knew a gene called Tbx18 is normally activated during the sinoatrial node’s development, when an embryo is forming. So they set out to add Tbx18 into a functioning, fully grown heart. To do it, they inserted the code for this gene into a virus, which they then inserted into the hearts of guinea pigs. The infected hearts beat according to this newly formed pacemaker, Eduardo Marbán and colleagues report in Nature Biotechnology. It also worked in a Petri dish.

The team used ventricular cells, one of three main types of heart cells (along with pacemaker cells and atrial cells). The infected cells changed their appearance, taking on a distinctive tapered shape, and this lasts even after the Tbx18 has faded away. That suggests it’s a permanent structural change, which means this could be a lasting treatment for diminished sinoatrial cells.

“This technology thus represents a promising alternative to electronic pacing devices,” Marbán et al. write. Longer-term experiments are still needed, but the work so far is promising, they say.