Category Archives: Wearables

Future hearable sensors could track physical, emotional state

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Apple has filed patent applications describing wireless earbuds that monitor health while a wearer talks on the phone or listens to music.  This has obvious exercise-related implications, but could potentially track the physiological impact of one’s emotional state while making calls, as a mobile mental health tool.

Sensors included in the patent include EKG, ICG, VO2 and GSR.

Click to view patent applications:

Patent 1   |   Patent 2   |   Patent 3


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston – Featuring Roz Picard, Tom Insel, John Rogers and Nathan Intrator – September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab

Sensor, data, and AI-driven primary care

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Forward has brought advanced technology to well-care.

Patient/Members are integrated into the practice with a baseline  screening via body scans, blood and genetic tests.  They are then given consumer and medical wearables, which work with proprietary algorithms, for continuous monitoring (and access to data), personalized treatment, and emergency alerts. Physical exam rooms display all of the data during doctor visits,

Ongoing primary care, including continuous health monitoring, body scans, gynecology, travel vaccinations, medication, nutrition guidance, blood tests and skin care is included in the fee-based system.

Forward investor Vinod Khosla will be interviewed by ApplySci’s Lisa Weiner Intrator on stage at Digital Health + NeuroTech at Stanford on February 7th at 4:15pm.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Sky Christopherson – Marcus Weldon – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

 

Consumer wearable + medical monitor track exercise’s impact on glucose

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Consumer wearables can complement medical devices by integrating activity data into a disease management strategy.

Fitbit movement data will now be used with a Medtronic diabetes management tool, with the goal of users predicting the impact of exercise on glucose levels.

Diabetics can monitor glucose with Medtronic’s iPro2 system continuously for 6 days. Fitbit data will integrated into the  iPro2 myLog app. Users will no longer need to log daily activity on paper, and the information is easily shared with physicians and caregivers.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Sky Christopherson – Marcus Weldon – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

 

Multiple wearable sensors predict illness

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Stanford’s Michael Snyder has published the results of a health wearable study, in which 2 billion measurements were taken from 60 subjects, concluding that such devices can be used to predict illness.

Continuous biosensor data, plus blood chemistry, gene expression and other tests,  were included. Participants wore 1-7 commercial wearables, which collected more than 250,000 measurements per day. Weight, heart rate, blood oxygen level, skin temperature, sleep, walking, biking and running, calories expended, acceleration, and exposure to gamma rays and X-rays were analyzed.

To individualize the process, both baseline and illness values were established for each person. It was possible to monitor deviations from normal, and associate those deviations with environmental, illness or other factors that affect health.  Deviation patterns correlated with specific health problems.  (The lead author was able to detect Lyme Disease in himself during the study.) Algorithms which spot these patterns could be used for future diagnostics or research.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Sky Christopherson – Marcus Weldon – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

 

 

Ultra-flexible transistor for discreet, continuous health monitoring

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Stanford professor Zhenan Bao‘s latest bioelectronic innovation has disrupted wearable technology as we know it.   The ultra-flexible transistor can be stretched to twice its length, without losing conductivity.  Conductors are confined inside an extremely thin, flexible polymer material, ideal for adhesive or tiny wearables. Digital health applications are unlimited —  providing discreet, continuous, and accurately monitoring.

According to Bao, “Transistors are the basic component of nearly all of the electronic devices that we use today. In the near future we will be able to make wearable electronics that are stretchable and able to conform to the human body.”

After 100 stretches, the transistors showed no signs of cracking and their conductivity reduced only very slightly.  This means that they could be attached to constantly moving body parts. As a demonstration, the technology was used in a simple electronic device worn around the knuckle of a finger that turned a small LED light on and off.

Professor Bao is the keynote speaker at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley — to be held on February 7-8, 2017 at Stanford University, and co-sponsored by the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Sky Christopherson – Marcus Weldon – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

Tiny wearable sensor measures blood flow

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Kyocera has developed a tiny optical sensor to measure blood flow volume in subcutaneous tissue, meant to be integrated into a phone or wearable. Potential applications include monitoring stress and preventing dehydration, heat stroke, and altitude sickness.

The device will be used  in/on an ear, finger or forehead, to measure the velocity-driven frequency of reflected light within blood vessels. The  sensor utilizes the relative shift in frequency and the strength of the reflected light  to determine blood-flow volume.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

 

Self regulating patch optimizes blood thinner delivery

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UNC and  NC State researchers have developed a promising, self-regulating, Heparin releasing patch, meant to optimize levels of the blood thinner in one’s body.  It has only been tested on animals, but was found to  be more effective at preventing thrombosis than traditional drug delivery methods.

Current protocol requires regular blood testing, to prevent hemorrhaging from a too-high dose, or, of course, thrombosis from an inadequate one.

The patch uses microneedles made of a polymer that consists of hyaluronic acid and  Heparin. It responds to thrombin, an enzyme that initiates blood clotting. When elevated thrombin levels come into contact with a microneedle, the enzymes break the amino acid chains that bind the Heparin to the HA, releasing the Heparin into the blood stream.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis


 

Cabin sensors, wearables, smart pills to monitor air passenger health

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British Airlines has filed a patent application for a system that would monitor when a passenger is awake, asleep, hungry, nervous, hot, cold or uncomfortable.

The “system and method for controlling the travel environment for a passenger” encompasses motion-sensing sleep monitors, wearables that track eye movement, heart rate, and temperature, and ingestible health-tracking pills.

The company aims to use the data to optimize a passenger’s environment/experience while flying.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

ApplySci is delighted to welcome the Bayer LifeScience iHUB as a sponsor of Digital Health + NeuroTech at Stanford.

Sensor sock detects diabetic inflammation, sends alerts

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Siren Care‘s real-time temperature sensing smart sock is meant to detect foot inflammation in diabetics.  The goal is early notification to prevent (difficult to heal) sores and other symptoms of the disease, which can lead to extreme complications.

Data is stored in the fabric  and in the cloud.  An app sends alerts when a temperature event occurs. The washable sock is meant to last for 6 months, as is its battery, which does not require charging.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

ApplySci is delighted to welcome the Bayer LifeScience iHUB as a sponsor of Digital Health + NeuroTech at Stanford.

Wearable patch monitors lactate, glucose, and pH in sweat

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Northwestern’s John Rogers has developed a wearable, sweat analyzing patch.  The flexible microfluidic device uses colorimetric biochemical assays and integrates smartphone image capture analysis to monitor lactate, glucose, chloride ion concentrations, and pH.  The wearable, with sports, military, and disease monitoring applications,  can be adapted to test tears and saliva.

Professor Rogers will be a keynote speaker at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley on February 7-8, 2017 at Stanford University — co-sponsored by the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (e-WEAR).


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

ApplySci is delighted to welcome the Bayer LifeScience iHUB as a sponsor of Digital Health + NeuroTech at Stanford.