Category Archives: Asthma

Graphene sensor detects asthma attacks early

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Azam Gholizadeh, Clifford Weisel, and Rutgers colleagues have created a graphene sensor for early molecular diagnosis of asthma attacks.  The goal is the development of wearables that will alert users to take medicine, as well as determine appropriate dosages.

Current non-invasive detection methods, such as spirometry, are limited in characterizing the nature and degree of airway inflammation, and require expensive, bulky equipment.

The miniaturized electrochemical sensor measures nitrite in exhaled breath condensate using reduced graphene oxide. Its rapid measurements can help asthma sufferers  determine if air pollutants are affecting them, to  better manage their medication and physical activity, and, hopefully, prevent complications, hospitalizations, and even deaths.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary

REGISTER BY JUNE 9 AND SAVE $400

 

GSK/Verily “biolectronic medicine” partnership for disease management

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Galvani Biolectronics is a Verily/GSK company, created to accelerate the research, development and commercialization of bioelectronic medicines. The goal is to find solutions to manage chronic diseases, such as arthritis, diabetes, and asthma, using  miniaturized electronics.  Implanted devices would  modify electrical signals that pass along nerves, including irregular impulses that occur in illness.

Initial work will focus on developing precision devices for inflammatory, metabolic and endocrine disorders, including type 2 diabetes, where substantial evidence already exists in animal models.

Every major pharmaceutical company (globally) attended  ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech conferences in San Francisco and New York.  We believe that partnerships similar to the Verily/GSK venture will proliferate — and that they will improve the lives of those with chronic diseases.


Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8, 2017 @ Stanford University

Chest/wrist wearable system predicts, aims to prevent, asthma attacks

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North Carolina State researchers are developing a multi-sensor wearable monitoring system meant to predict and prevent asthma attacks. A chest-worn patch  track one’s respiratory rate, skin impedance and wheezing in the lungs. A wristband monitors volatile organic compounds and ozone in the air, ambient humidity, and temperature, as well as a a wearer’s movements, heart rate and blood oxygen level. Users must also breathe into a spirometer several times per day to measure lung function.

An algorithm  identifies which environmental and physiological variables are effective at predicting asthma attacks. Wearers receive notifications suggesting a change in environment or activity to prevent an attack.

Glucose monitoring breath test

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Applied Nanodetectors is in the early stages of developing a noninvasive breath sensor for diabetics to monitor daily glucose levels.  By measuring the levels of volatile organic compounds in breath, if accurate, this could replace finger pricking for disease sufferers, and create a simple diagnostic test.

The company has a related product that monitors the concentration of exhaled trace gas chemicals in an asthma patient’s breath, before symptoms develop, for early warning of attacks.

This, and similar technologies (see ApplySci, 1/11/16), could lead to the incorporation of medical grade sensors into smartphones, which could enable continuous monitoring of multiple conditions.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Wearable, home, school sensors + app predict asthma attacks

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ApplySci is pleased to report another sensor-based initiative to combat asthma.

Alex Bui and colleagues from UCLA and USC are creating technology for smart phones and watches to identify asthma attack triggers.  The program is part of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering’s Pediatric Research using Integrated Sensor Monitoring Systems  initiative.

The  platform will transmit data to a phone from wearable sensors, and those placed in homes and schools. The information is sent to the cloud, where it will be integrated with  electronic health records and real-time weather, air quality, pollen count  reports.


 

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH NYC – JUNE 7, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

NEUROTECH NYC – JUNE 8, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Medication sensing inhaler correlates adherence, attacks

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Propeller Health and GSK are developing of an inhaler-integrated medication sensor that will automatically collect and record usage data.  The system combines sensors, mobile apps, analytics, and feedback for patients and caregivers.

The companies believes that it will help doctors better understand asthma and COPD, predict attacks, and reduce hospitalizations.

Information will be collected in a central data repository and analyzed for adherence patterns across patient populations, and correlations between adherence and safety, efficacy and economic outcomes.


 

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH NYC – JUNE 7, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

NEUROTECH NYC – JUNE 8, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Street View cars map health-impacting pollutants

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Google has partnered with Aclima to map urban air quality through Street View cars.

Mobile sensors on the  cars will  measure nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, ozone, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and other  pollutants that can affect health.

A  experiment was conductedin Denver.  The cars drove for 750 hours, over 30 days, and gathered 150 million data points. The testing was done during the DISCOVER-AQ study conducted by NASA and the EPA.

The project will be expanded, beginning in San Francisco this fall.

Inhaler sensors track asthma severity across cities

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Propeller Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, through their Air Louisville program, are using sensors on asthma inhalers to track when, where and how often inhalers are used. This helps patients manage symptoms, and city officials warn of increased chances of asthma severity in certain areas.

Sensors attach to inhaled medication, and a smartphone app and physician-facing website analyze the data. Patients are given the inhalers for free.  The use of “rescue medication” (short-acting bronchodilators) and daily maintenance medication are monitored.

Air sampling monitors are overlayed onto the EPA monitor backbone to  determine connections between air quality, environmental factors, and asthma severity.

Propeller Health plans to expand its asthma monitoring program to five U.S. cities.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH NYC 2015 – JUNE 30 @ NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.  EARLY REGISTRATION RATE ENDS FRIDAY, 5/15

Wearable detects asthma triggers

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North Carolina State University‘s Veena Misra is developing a wearable that detects asthma triggers.

The device monitors environmental factors, such as ozone, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide levels, as well as vital signs including heart rate and hydration. Sensor data is transmitted wirelessly to a phone or physician’s office.  The intention is to guide people away from environmental conditions that exacerbate asthma and related respiratory issues.

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC 2015 – June 30 @ New York Academy of Sciences.  Register before April 24 and save $300.

ResearchKit can simplify, improve diagnostics

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As a company devoted to improving the human condition through health innovation, ApplySci was delighted to hear yesterday’s ResearchKit announcement.  The framework allows people to easily join health studies, and simplifies the process by bringing research to one’s phone.

ResearchKit’s first tests detect Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and breast cancer.  Apple worked with 12 institutions to create the app, including some which will participate in ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC 2015 conference.

Apple’s (admirable) goal is to more easily recruit research subjects, and improve accuracy by increasing sample size and diversity.  Data is captured and recorded using iPhone sensors.  Examples include:

  • An iPhone’s microphone can detect tiny voice  fluctuations that may indicate Parkinson’s disease.
  • An iPhone’s screen can detect tapping inconsistencies associated with disease.
  • An iPhone accelerometer can compare one’s gait and balance against a healthy person’s speed and posture.

Users control their own data, and decide if, how, and when to share it.   Apple will not have access to it.  The company hopes that external developers will soon dramatically increase the number of tests available.

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC 2015 – June 30 @ New York Academy of Sciences .  Early registration rate available until March 27th.