Cheap, noninvasive patch monitors glucose

UCSD’s Joe Wang‘s needless adhesive glucose monitor has begun a phase I clinical trial.  The small patch measures insulin levels through sweat on the skin, eliminating the need for a skin prick.  The paper – tattoo is printed with two integrated electrodes that apply a small amount of electrical current.  Glucose molecules residing below the skin are forced to rise to the surface, allowing blood sugar to be measured.

Through its SENSOR study,  the team s testing the tattoo-like sensor’s accuracy, compared to a traditional glucometer. The  trial is enrolling 50 adults, ages 18 to 75, with type 1 or 2 diabetes, or diabetes due to other causes. Participants wear a sensor while fasting, and up to 2 hours after eating.

The goal is a cheap, noninvasive, discreet, user friendly glucose monitor that provides continuous measurement.  The sensor currently provides only one readout.


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Non-invasive glucose monitoring patch

Richard Guy and University of Bath colleagues have created a non-invasive, adhesive patch, to measure glucose levels through the skin without a finger-prick blood test.

The patch draws glucose from fluid between cells across hair follicles, accessed individually via an array of miniature sensors using a small electric current. The glucose collects in tiny reservoirs and is measured. Readings can be taken every 10 to 15 minutes over several hours. Calibration with a blood sample is not required.

The goal is the development of a low-cost, wearable sensor that sends regular, clinically relevant glucose measurements to one’s phone or watch, with alerts when action is required.


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Glucose-monitoring smartphone case

GPhone, developed by UCSD’s Joe Wang and Patrick Mercier, is a  smartphone case and accompanying app that records and tracks glucose readings. It is 3D-printed and has a permanent, reusable sensor on its corner. Enzyme pellets magnetically attach to the sensor, and are stored in a 3D stylus on the side.

Users dispense a pellet from the stylus onto a bare strip on the case, activating the sensor.  A drop of blood is then put on the sensor strip.  Results are displayed on the screen, and the pellet is then discarded.

The next step is to integrate glucose sensing directly into the smartphone.  This is now in the proof of concept stage.


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Registration rates increase Friday, December 15th

Patch monitors diabetes compounds in sweat for 1 week

University of Texas professor Shalini Prasad has developed an adhesive sensor that measures diabetes-associated compounds in small amounts of sweat.

Blood glucose levels, cortisol and interleukin-6 are detected in perspiration for one week with full signal integrity.  The device uses ambient sweat, created by the body with out stimulation.

The sensor can be placed anywhere on the skin and takes customized readings up to once an hour.  Data is sent to a user’s phone.

Prasad estimates that the sensors would cost 7 cents each if produced in bulk, making the technology truly accessible.


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ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY –  FEATURING:  ZHENAN BAO – JUSTIN SANCHEZ – BRYAN JOHNSON – NATHAN INTRATOR – VINOD KHOSLA

 

Transparent, stretchable lens sensor for diabetes, glaucoma detection

UNIST professors Jang-Ung Park, Chang Young Lee and Franklin Bien, and KNU professors Hong Kyun Kim and Kwi-Hyun Bae, have developed a contact lens sensor to monitor biomarkers for intraocular pressure, diabetes mellitus, and other health conditions. Several attempts have been  made to monitor diabetes via glucose in tears.  The challenge has been poor wearability, as the electrodes used in existing smart contact lenses are opaque, obscuring  one’s view.  Many wearers also complained of significant discomfort from the lens-shaped firm plastic material. The research team addressed this by developing a sensor based on transparent, stretchable, flexible materials  graphene sheets and metal nanowires. This allowed the creation of lenses comfortable and accurate enough for eventual self-monitoring of glucose levels and eye pressure. Patients can transmit their health information through an embedded wireless antenna in the leans, allowing real-time monitoring  The system uses  the wireless antenna to read sensor information, eliminating the need for a separate power source.

Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab. Featuring Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator

Apple reportedly developing non-invasive glucose monitor

CNBC’s Christina Farr has reported that Apple has been quietly developing a non-invasive, sensor-based glucose monitor.  The technology has apparently advanced to the trial stage.

Diabetes has become a global epidemic.  Continuous monitoring, automatic insulin delivery, and the “artificial pancreas” are significant steps forward, meant to control the disease, and avoid its debilitating side effects.  While some systems consist of micro-needles just below the skin, to date, none are totally non-invasive.

The ideal solution would be the use of the Apple Watch and other fitness/lifestyle trackers to control behavior to the point that the disease is avoided entirely.  However, if diagnosed, a non-invasive glucose sensor would transform the daily life of diabetics.


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Consumer wearable + medical monitor track exercise’s impact on glucose

Consumer wearables can complement medical devices by integrating activity data into a disease management strategy.

Fitbit movement data will now be used with a Medtronic diabetes management tool, with the goal of users predicting the impact of exercise on glucose levels.

Diabetics can monitor glucose with Medtronic’s iPro2 system continuously for 6 days. Fitbit data will integrated into the  iPro2 myLog app. Users will no longer need to log daily activity on paper, and the information is easily shared with physicians and caregivers.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Sky Christopherson – Marcus Weldon – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

 

Diabetic retinopathy-detecting algorithm for remote diagnosis

Google has developed an algorithm which it claims is capable of detecting diabetic retinopathy in photographs.  The goal is to improve the quality and availability of screening for, and early detection of,  the common and debilitating condition.

Typically, highly trained specialists are required to examine photos, to detect the lesions that indicate bleeding and fluid leakage in the eye. This obviously makes screening difficult in poor and remote locations.

Google developed a dataset of 128,000 images, each evaluated by 3-7 specially-trained doctors, which trained  a neural network to detect referable diabetic retinopathy.  Performance was tested on two clinical validation sets of 12,000 images. The majority decision of a panel 7 or 8 ophthalmologists served as the reference standard. The results showed that the accuracy of the  Google  algorithm was equal to that of the physicians.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

Sensor sock detects diabetic inflammation, sends alerts

Siren Care‘s real-time temperature sensing smart sock is meant to detect foot inflammation in diabetics.  The goal is early notification to prevent (difficult to heal) sores and other symptoms of the disease, which can lead to extreme complications.

Data is stored in the fabric  and in the cloud.  An app sends alerts when a temperature event occurs. The washable sock is meant to last for 6 months, as is its battery, which does not require charging.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

ApplySci is delighted to welcome the Bayer LifeScience iHUB as a sponsor of Digital Health + NeuroTech at Stanford.

Fully transparent, glucose monitoring contact lens

Oregon State’s Greg Herman has developed a transparent sensor to monitor glucose (via tears) in a contact lens.  The device could also be used to control insulin infusions, by transmitting real-time data to a pump.

Similar technology has been developed by Google, although their lens is not (currently) fully transparent, and Noviosense, which requires a user to insert a device in the lower lid.

Herman believes that the lens sensor could also be used to monitor stress hormones, uric acid, and  ocular pressure in glaucoma.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth