Category Archives: Sensors

Patch monitors diabetes compounds in sweat for 1 week

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

University of Texas professor Shalini Prasad has developed an adhesive sensor that measures diabetes-associated compounds in small amounts of sweat.

Blood glucose levels, cortisol and interleukin-6 are detected in perspiration for one week with full signal integrity.  The device uses ambient sweat, created by the body with out stimulation.

The sensor can be placed anywhere on the skin and takes customized readings up to once an hour.  Data is sent to a user’s phone.

Prasad estimates that the sensors would cost 7 cents each if produced in bulk, making the technology truly accessible.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Riccardo Sabatini – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY –  FEATURING:  ZHENAN BAO – JUSTIN SANCHEZ – BRYAN JOHNSON – NATHAN INTRATOR – VINOD KHOSLA

 

Small, adhesive, wireless patch collects, transmits, extensive health data

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Northwestern’s John Rogers and Kyung-In Jang of the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology have developed a small, adhesive, flexible silicone patch capable of monitoring multiple health parameters.

The soft, body-conforming wearable contains 50 components connected by  250  3-D wire coils embedded in protective silicone.  It collects and wirelessly transmits data about movement, respiration, and  electrical activity in the heart, muscles, eyes and brain.

Jang believes that the biosensors could be devloped into a closed loop medical system using big data and AI, and thereby facilitate quality remote healthcare. The team is also exploring the use of the patch in robotics and self-driving cars.

Professor Rogers will present his research at ApplySci’s upcoming Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference, on September 19th at the MIT Media Lab.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Registration rates increase Friday, August 25th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY –  FEATURING:  ZHENAN BAO – JUSTIN SANCHEZ – BRYAN JOHNSON – NATHAN INTRATOR – VINOD KHOSLA

Apple patents multi-parameter, phone-based health tracking

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Apple  has been granted a patent for phone technology using a front-facing camera and light, proximity, and multiple sensors to measure body fat, heart rate, circulation, blood pressure, and breathing, as well as emotional state via galvanic skin response. The device computes health data of the user based upon sensor data regarding the received light. It has been reported that Facebook and Google are also developing device driven health monitoring systems. Mindstrong Health, co-founded by former NIMH and Verily Life Science head Tom Insel, is developing phone-based technology to measure and monitor emotional and mental health. Insel will be a featured speaker at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference, on September 19th, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, August 11th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY

 

Sensor glove translates sign language, mimics gestures

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

UCSD’s Timothy O’Connor and Darren Lipomi have developed  The Language of Glove — glove that wirelessly translates American Sign Language into text, and controls a virtual hand to mimic sign language gestures. It was built for less than $100 using stretchable and printable electronics.

Nine silicon-based polymer sensors, with a conductive carbon paint, were taped to the back and knuckles of a leather glove.  They  were secured with copper tape, and stainless steel thread connected them to a low power, custom-printed circuit board, at the back of the wrist.

The sensors changed their electrical resistance when stretched or bent. This allowed them to code different letters of the American Sign Language alphabet, based on the positions of all nine knuckles. The circuit board converted the  code into letters, and transmitted the signals via Bluetooth to a  phone or computer.

The team is investigating other uses for the glove, including VR, AR, telesurgery, technical training, and defense. The next version  is intended to have a sense of touch.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 28th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Sensor detects asthma, cancer, diabetes in breath

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

KAIST professor Il-doo Kim 김일두 has developed a sensor that can diagnose diseases by measuring the concentration change of the specific gases in the breath, with out blood or imaging tests. Animal protein is used as a catalyst.  The researchers claim that detection can be done at the time of disease metabolism, enabling early diagnosis.

Hydrogen, acetone, toluene, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen monoxide, and moisture are biomarker gases are emitted at high concentrations in patients with  diseases such as asthma, lung cancer, and Type 1 diabetes.  The 16 sensor array system recognizes human fingerprints and individual breathing patterns associated  with each condition.

Technion professor Hossam Haick has been studying non-invasive breath-based detection of disease, including cancer, since 2007, and his Na-Nose technology was commercialized in 2013.

Click to view Il-Doo Kim discussing breath-based disease detection.

Click to view Hossam Haick discussing breath-based disease detection.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Hypoallergenic, continuous, week-long health wearable

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya has developed a hypoallergenic, adhesive, continuous health sensor. The device can be worn comfortably for a week because of its nanoscal mesh elastic electrodes.  This allows the skin to breathe, preventing inflammation.

The electrodes contains a  biologically compatible,  water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and a gold layer. The wearable  is applied by spraying a tiny amount of water, which dissolves the PVA nanofibers, and allows it to stick easily to the skin. It conforms to curvilinear surfaces of human skin, such as sweat pores and the ridges of an index finger’s fingerprint pattern.

A study of 20 subjects wearing the device showed that  electrical activity of muscles were comparable to those obtained through conventional gel electrodes.  There was no inflammation after one week, and repeated bending and stretching did not cause damage, making this a potentially disruptive method to monitor health and performance.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Thin, flexible, adhesive, continuous, cuffless blood pressure sensor

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Zhao Ni and Yuan-ting Zhang of the Chinese University of Hong Kong have developed an ultra-thin, waterproof, cuffless blood pressure  sensor that can be worn on the wrist, woven into clothes or bed sheets, or integrated into an earpiece. The monitor detects blood flow and monitors  health data through color reflected by skin and image depth. It provides continuous, wireless monitoring and abnormality alerts.

Professor Zhao believes that in the future, the sensor could use AI to improve itself.  She intends to  broaden its applications to include monitoring breathing rate and blood oxygen level, to also replace a finger -worn pulse oximeter. 


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 23rd

 

Sensor-embedded respiration, feeding tubes in the ICU

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Art Medical‘s sensor-embedded feeding and respiratory  tubes provide continuous measurement of gastric reflux and, saliva. These secretions, currently measured manually in the ICU, can cause aspiration pneumonia and ventilator associated pneumonia, which can prolong hospital stays, or cause death.  Urine output is also measured, in an attempt to prevent kidney failure.

The company’s digestive, respiratory, and urinary sensors gather data in real time, which is processed in the cloud, and sent to the medical team automatically for immediate treatment.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 23rd.

 

 

Adhesive patch + nose wearable detect sleep apnea

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Somnarus has developed a disposable, adhesive patch that detects obstructive sleep apnea at home.

The SomnaPatch is worn on the forehead, wth an addtional piece on the nose. It records nasal pressure, blood oxygen saturation, pulse rate, respiratory effort, body position and how long a patient is asleep.

An 174-patient study showed that results from the SomnaPatch matched standard in-lab polysomnography 87% of the time.

If the device is proven effective in larger studies, it could be a cheaper, more comfortable alternative to lab-based sleep studies.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 9th.

Graphene sensor detects asthma attacks early

FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin

Azam Gholizadeh, Clifford Weisel, and Rutgers colleagues have created a graphene sensor for early molecular diagnosis of asthma attacks.  The goal is the development of wearables that will alert users to take medicine, as well as determine appropriate dosages.

Current non-invasive detection methods, such as spirometry, are limited in characterizing the nature and degree of airway inflammation, and require expensive, bulky equipment.

The miniaturized electrochemical sensor measures nitrite in exhaled breath condensate using reduced graphene oxide. Its rapid measurements can help asthma sufferers  determine if air pollutants are affecting them, to  better manage their medication and physical activity, and, hopefully, prevent complications, hospitalizations, and even deaths.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary

REGISTER BY JUNE 9 AND SAVE $400