Category Archives: Sensors

Sensor detects asthma, cancer, diabetes in breath

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KAIST professor Il-doo Kim 김일두 has developed a sensor that can diagnose diseases by measuring the concentration change of the specific gases in the breath, with out blood or imaging tests. Animal protein is used as a catalyst.  The researchers claim that detection can be done at the time of disease metabolism, enabling early diagnosis.

Hydrogen, acetone, toluene, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen monoxide, and moisture are biomarker gases are emitted at high concentrations in patients with  diseases such as asthma, lung cancer, and Type 1 diabetes.  The 16 sensor array system recognizes human fingerprints and individual breathing patterns associated  with each condition.

Technion professor Hossam Haick has been studying non-invasive breath-based detection of disease, including cancer, since 2007, and his Na-Nose technology was commercialized in 2013.

Click to view Il-Doo Kim discussing breath-based disease detection.

Click to view Hossam Haick discussing breath-based disease detection.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Hypoallergenic, continuous, week-long health wearable

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University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya has developed a hypoallergenic, adhesive, continuous health sensor. The device can be worn comfortably for a week because of its nanoscal mesh elastic electrodes.  This allows the skin to breathe, preventing inflammation.

The electrodes contains a  biologically compatible,  water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and a gold layer. The wearable  is applied by spraying a tiny amount of water, which dissolves the PVA nanofibers, and allows it to stick easily to the skin. It conforms to curvilinear surfaces of human skin, such as sweat pores and the ridges of an index finger’s fingerprint pattern.

A study of 20 subjects wearing the device showed that  electrical activity of muscles were comparable to those obtained through conventional gel electrodes.  There was no inflammation after one week, and repeated bending and stretching did not cause damage, making this a potentially disruptive method to monitor health and performance.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Thin, flexible, adhesive, continuous, cuffless blood pressure sensor

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Zhao Ni and Yuan-ting Zhang of the Chinese University of Hong Kong have developed an ultra-thin, waterproof, cuffless blood pressure  sensor that can be worn on the wrist, woven into clothes or bed sheets, or integrated into an earpiece. The monitor detects blood flow and monitors  health data through color reflected by skin and image depth. It provides continuous, wireless monitoring and abnormality alerts.

Professor Zhao believes that in the future, the sensor could use AI to improve itself.  She intends to  broaden its applications to include monitoring breathing rate and blood oxygen level, to also replace a finger -worn pulse oximeter. 


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 23rd

 

Sensor-embedded respiration, feeding tubes in the ICU

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Art Medical‘s sensor-embedded feeding and respiratory  tubes provide continuous measurement of gastric reflux and, saliva. These secretions, currently measured manually in the ICU, can cause aspiration pneumonia and ventilator associated pneumonia, which can prolong hospital stays, or cause death.  Urine output is also measured, in an attempt to prevent kidney failure.

The company’s digestive, respiratory, and urinary sensors gather data in real time, which is processed in the cloud, and sent to the medical team automatically for immediate treatment.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 23rd.

 

 

Adhesive patch + nose wearable detect sleep apnea

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Somnarus has developed a disposable, adhesive patch that detects obstructive sleep apnea at home.

The SomnaPatch is worn on the forehead, wth an addtional piece on the nose. It records nasal pressure, blood oxygen saturation, pulse rate, respiratory effort, body position and how long a patient is asleep.

An 174-patient study showed that results from the SomnaPatch matched standard in-lab polysomnography 87% of the time.

If the device is proven effective in larger studies, it could be a cheaper, more comfortable alternative to lab-based sleep studies.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 9th.

Graphene sensor detects asthma attacks early

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Azam Gholizadeh, Clifford Weisel, and Rutgers colleagues have created a graphene sensor for early molecular diagnosis of asthma attacks.  The goal is the development of wearables that will alert users to take medicine, as well as determine appropriate dosages.

Current non-invasive detection methods, such as spirometry, are limited in characterizing the nature and degree of airway inflammation, and require expensive, bulky equipment.

The miniaturized electrochemical sensor measures nitrite in exhaled breath condensate using reduced graphene oxide. Its rapid measurements can help asthma sufferers  determine if air pollutants are affecting them, to  better manage their medication and physical activity, and, hopefully, prevent complications, hospitalizations, and even deaths.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary

REGISTER BY JUNE 9 AND SAVE $400

 

Earbud sensor reportedly measures blood pressure, dehydration

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As health sensors become more discreet, and fused with commonly worn devices, Kyocera has integrated a tiny, optical sensor into its earbud.  The hybrid music/phone/health use wearable measures blood flow in hypodermal tissues using Laser Doppler velocimetry. It can monitor nerve and blood pressure, levels of dehydration, and possible signs of heat stroke.  Sleep monitoring can be done more accurately than with current devices, and the effect of music on brain states can also be studied.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab. Featuring Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda

REGISTER BY MAY 19TH AND SAVE $500

Transparent, stretchable lens sensor for diabetes, glaucoma detection

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UNIST professors Jang-Ung Park, Chang Young Lee and Franklin Bien, and KNU professors Hong Kyun Kim and Kwi-Hyun Bae, have developed a contact lens sensor to monitor biomarkers for intraocular pressure, diabetes mellitus, and other health conditions. Several attempts have been  made to monitor diabetes via glucose in tears.  The challenge has been poor wearability, as the electrodes used in existing smart contact lenses are opaque, obscuring  one’s view.  Many wearers also complained of significant discomfort from the lens-shaped firm plastic material. The research team addressed this by developing a sensor based on transparent, stretchable, flexible materials  graphene sheets and metal nanowires. This allowed the creation of lenses comfortable and accurate enough for eventual self-monitoring of glucose levels and eye pressure. Patients can transmit their health information through an embedded wireless antenna in the leans, allowing real-time monitoring  The system uses  the wireless antenna to read sensor information, eliminating the need for a separate power source.

Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab. Featuring Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator

Wall sensor monitors walking speed, stride to track health

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MIT’s Dina KatabiChen-Yu Hsu, and colleagues have developed WiGait, a wall sensor that detects walking speed and stride to monitor health. This builds on previous MIT research which showed that radio signals could track breathing and heart rate, without wearables.

The  system works by transmitting low-power radio signals and analyzing how they reflect off  bodies within a radius of 9 to 12 meters. Machine learning algorithms separated walking periods from other activities and found the stable phase within each walking period.  The sensor, when combined with wearable devices, could also track Parkinson’s and MS symptoms, and help predict health events related to  heart failure,  lung disease, kidney failure, and stroke, as well as the risk of falls. Caregivers could also be notified in emergencies.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab. Featuring Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator

Sweat sensor for cystic fibrosis detection, drug optimization, glucose monitoring

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Carlos Milla, Ronald Davis, and Stanford and Berkeley colleagues have developed a wearable sweat sensor for detecting cystic fibrosis, diabetes and other diseases.  It can also aid drug development and personalization, and continuously monitor patients.

The flexible sensor/microprocessor system adheres to the skin, stimulates sweat glands, and detects the presence of molecules and ions based on electrical signals.  Increased chloride generates increased electrical voltage at the sensor’s surface.  High levels of chloride ions indicate cystic fibrosis.

Conventional methods for diagnosing cystic fibrosis require a visit to a specialized center, where a patient does not move for 30 minutes, while electrodes stimulate their sweat glands. A lab then measures chloride ions in the sweat to diagnose the disease. This method hasn’t changed in 70 years.

The wearable sweat sensor stimulates skin to produce minute amounts of sweat, quickly evaluates the contents, and sends the data via phone, to the cloud, for immediate analysis.   The system is portable and self-contained, and ideal for use in children, and in underserved communities.

As CF is caused by hundreds of different mutations in the CF gene,  it’s possible to use the sensor to determine which drugs work best for which mutations.

The device was also used to compare levels of glucose in sweat to that in blood.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab. Featuring Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator