Category Archives: Heart

Machine learning tools predict heart failure

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Declan O’Regan and MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences colleagues believe that AI can predict when pulmonary hypertension patients require more aggressive treatment to prevent death.

In a recent study,  machine learning software automatically analyzed moving images of a patient’s heart, captured during an MRI. It then used  image processing to build a “virtual 3D heart”, replicating how 30,000 points in the heart contract during each beat. The researchers fed the system data from hundreds of previous patients. By linking the data and models, the system learned which attributes of a heart, its shape and structure, put an individual at risk of heart failure.

The software was developed using data from 256 patients with pulmonary hypertension. It correctly predicted those who would still be alive after one year 80% of the time. The figure for doctors is 60%.

The researchers  want to test the technology in other forms of heart failure, including cardiomyopathy, to see when a pacemaker or other form of treatment is needed.

Click to view MRC London video.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Sky Christopherson – Marcus Weldon – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

 

 

Implanted sensors predict heart failure events

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Penn State’s John Boehmer used Boston Scientific’s HeartLogic sensors (retrofitted in already implanted devices) to track heart failure in a study of 900 patients. The goal was continuous monitoring and early event detection and prevention.

Currently, heart failure is (not very successfully) managed by monitoring weight and reported symptoms.   One in five patients are readmitted within 30 days after being hospitalized for the condition.

The 900 patients were followed for one year. Software was uploaded to an implanted defibrillator, allowing it to act as sensors. Heart rate, activity, breathing, heart sounds and electrical activity in the chest were tracked.

70 percent of heart failure events were detected, usually more than a month before their occurance.  False positives were also reported,  which the researchers deemed to be in an ” acceptable range.”


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

 

Tiny sensor monitors the heart, recognizes speech, enables human-machine interfaces

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Northwestern professor John Rogers has released a paper detailing his latest tiny, wearable, flexible, highly accurate health sensor, which monitors the heart, recognizes speech, and can enable human-machine interfaces.  Professor Yonggang Huang is the corresponding author.

The soft, continuous monitor adheres to any part of the body, detecting mechanical waves that propagate through tissues and fluids in physiological activity — revealing acoustical signatures of individual events.  These include the opening and closing of heart valves, vocal cord vibration, and gastrointestinal tract movement.  ECG and EMG  electrodes can also be integrated.

Obvious practical applications include remote health monitoring, enabling seniors to age in place, and battlefield health and robot/drone control.  The vocal cord monitoring feature could also be used to assist the disabled communicate or control a keyboard.

ApplySci is honored to include Professor Rogers as a keynote speaker at Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley, on February 7-8, 2017, at Stanford University.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Registration rates increase today, November 18, 2016

 

 

Voice analysis as a diagnostic tool

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Beyond Verbal recently used its emotion-detecting voice analysis app in an attempt to predict coronary artery disease in 150 study participants, 120 of whom had presented for angiography.  The company claims to have identified 13 voice features  associated with CAD – and one associated with a 19-fold increase in its likelihood.

The researchers said that the voice indicator was strongest when a subject described a negative experience.  As this suggests an emotional connection to heart disease, could a neurotech wearable, that provides brain activity analysis, validate the process?  The company is already studying voice changes in Autism and Parkinson’s disease, but this was the first time they used their voice diagnostic tool in a non-brain disease study.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Registration rates increase Friday, November 18th

Verily developing low-power health wearable

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

While visiting Verily last week, an MIT Technology Review journalist saw and described the company’s wearable vital tracker, called the “Cardiac and Activity Monitor” by  CTO Brian Otis.  Its novelty is a low-power e-paper display, which will address the universal problem of battery life.  Only with guaranteed continuous measurement can meaningful data be gathered and health analyzed.

The watch is reported to track pulse, heart rythm, skin temperature, light exposure, and noise levels — and perhaps cuffless blood pressure monitoring will be added to the mix.

The device is meant for use in medical research, with the goal of predicting disease.  According to scientific adviser (and former Mass General Physician-in-Chief) Dennis Ausiello: “The watch is one of several hardware activities that have a common goal, which is how to better manage the human condition and interrogate the human organism at scale across health and illness.”


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Electronic scaffold replaces damaged tissue, stimulates heart

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Charles Lieber and Harvard colleagues have designed nanoscale electronic scaffolds, seeded with cardiac cells to produce a “bionic” patch to replace damaged cardiac tissue.  The flexible electronics can also electrically stimulate the heart, and change the frequency and direction of signal propagation, as tissue feedback is continuously monitored.

Instead of being located on the skin’s surface, electronic components are integrated throughout the tissue, allowing the detection of  early-stage cardiac instabilities and faster intervention. The device operates at  lower, safer voltages than a traditional pacemaker.

The patch could also be used to monitor responses to cardiac drugs, or to help  determine the effectiveness of drugs under development.

Wearable detects cardiac arrest, notifies emergency services

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

 iBeat is a wearable emergency response system that continuously monitors the heart.  Meant for seniors, it detects cardiac arrest in real time, provides alerts, and sends regular updates to caregivers.

If cardiac arrest is detected, the wearer receives a call within 10 seconds.  If he/she cannot be reached, an emergency contact and emergency medical services are called.

A user can also activate the device manually in an emergency, such as a fall, car accident, or home invasion.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Wearable patch simultaneously monitors biochemical, electric signals

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Joe Wang and Patrick Mercier of UCSD have developed a flexible, wearable, patch that monitors both biochemical and electric signals.

Most  wearables only measure one parameter, such as steps or heart rate, and few measure chemical signals. The Chem-Phys patch records EKG signals, and tracks lactate levels, marking physical effort, in real time.  It  is worn on the chest and communicates wirelessly with a phone or computer. The system could help optimize athletic training, or continuously monitor heart patients, among other uses.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Sports camera collects, overlays health data

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

As part of its new developer program, GoPro has partnered with Polar to overlay health data on videos. Similar to video games, sports videos will be able to display heart rate, speed, distance, and altitude.  This has been presented as a fun feature, but could also provide physicians with a better understanding of one’s health in various scenarios.

Click to view Polar video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Heart monitoring patch tracks patients post-discharge

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

BeVITAL by Vital Connect, in partnership with BePatient, is a clinical grade, continuous, heart monitoring wearable, and data sharing system, for the early detection of abnormalities post-discharge. The thin, disposable patch adheres to the chest, and tracks heart activity, breathing, temperature, movement, posture, and falls. It can be used for 4 days, and transmits data to a phone or hub before it is stored in the cloud.

The system has been tested on 100 patients in Europe, and will soon be trialed at the John Muir Medical Center.  The study will compare data quality and patient outcomes of BeVITAL wearers with inpatient care.

Click to view KTVU News video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences