Category Archives: Uncategorized

Robotic leg brace helps stroke patients walk

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Toyota’s Welwalk WW-1000 exoskeleton is designed to help those with paralysis on one side of their body walk again. The frame is worn on the affected leg, with a  motor at the knee joint that provides calibrated assistance based on a user’s ability.  Wearers are trained to recover their walking ability over time.

The robotic device is paired with a treadmill and harness that is controlled by medical staff. The  system will be rented to hospitals in Japan for $9000, plus $3200 per month.

The hope is that it will dramatically speed recovery time for stroke patients. The  brace integrates sensors that determine exactly how much support to provide  at any given point, ensuring that patients aren’t over-reliant on support, or rushed before they’re ready to progress.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab. Featuring Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator

Tiny wearable sensor measures blood flow

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Kyocera has developed a tiny optical sensor to measure blood flow volume in subcutaneous tissue, meant to be integrated into a phone or wearable. Potential applications include monitoring stress and preventing dehydration, heat stroke, and altitude sickness.

The device will be used  in/on an ear, finger or forehead, to measure the velocity-driven frequency of reflected light within blood vessels. The  sensor utilizes the relative shift in frequency and the strength of the reflected light  to determine blood-flow volume.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

 

“Mixed Reality” headset could support surgery, rehab, learning

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Magic Leap has unveiled its “mixed reality” headset, where  virtual objects are integrated into the real world.  In addition to obvious gaming and entertainment applications, the system could be used in healthcare (including in surgery, surgery preparation, and orthopedic rehabilitation) and education.

The company remains vague in its description of its technology, but head and hand tracking functionality appear to have been added.   According to founder Rony Abramovitz, “Magic Leap doesn’t trick the brain. Rather it shoots photons into the eye that stimulate the cones and rods as if the hologram were real, or neurologically true.”

Click to view Magic Leap video.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Wrist-worn wearable detects Atrial Fibrillation, sends alerts

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AliveCor is known for its FDA approved mobile EKG, which attaches to a phone or tablet.  The company has just announced  Kardia – an Apple Watch band that, when a sensor is pressed and paired with an app, can provide and accurate EKG, incorporate a user’s spoken symptoms into its analysis, and share data.  AliveCor said that the band and app can detect Atrial Fibrillation, which would be shared with a doctor immediately.

Click to view AliveCor video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Injectable nanotech device continuously monitors glucose

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Kyungsuk Yum at the University of Texas is developing an internal, nanoscale device to continuously analyze blood sugar.   A near infrared optical biosensor nanotube is injected, and an optical scanner accesses data for constant monitoring .

Current continuous monitoring technology for diabetes requires a tube inserted through the abdomen.  This reads glucose levels in tissue, which is not as accurate as blood reading.  It must be calibrated several times per day, and changed every week.

The traditional glucometer system requires blood-drawing finger pricks throughout  the day.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2106 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH NYC – JUNE 7, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

NEUROTECH NYC – JUNE 8, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Smart airline uniforms improve passenger safety

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easyJet has partnered with CuteCircuit to create sensor embedded crew uniforms to improve passenger safety.

Cabin crew uniforms have shoulder LEDs and illuminated hems to provide lighting. Lapel LEDs display fight numbers, and microphones  in the fabric enable immediate communication.

Engineers’ uniforms have LEDs in  jacket hoods to illuminate work areas, and built in cameras to share photos for assistance.  Integrated air quality sensors and barometers notify workers of environmental issues, and create a city-by-city air quality map for passengers.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

Norwest’s Robert Mittendorff on digital health investing

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Norwest Venture Partners’ Robert Mittendorff participated in ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC conference.  Here is his interview with StartUp Health’s Steven Krein on digital health investing.

UPCOMING APPLYSCI CONFERENCES:

Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 – Early registration discount ends October 10th

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 – Early registration discount ends October 10th.

Ultra-low-field, portable MRI

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Los Alamos National Laboratory‘s Michelle Espy is developing an ultra-low-field, lightweight MRI system for use on the battlefield and in poor countries.  The device will be simple to transport, set up, and use in non-traditional settings.

Conventional MRI machines use large magnetic fields that align protons in water molecules. Magnetic resonance signals are detected and turned into images. Highly detailed images are created, but the process is complicated and expensive. Espy uses Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID) to create quality images with ultra-low-magnetic fields.

The  first generation (battlefield) “b”MRI was built in a large metal housing to shield it from interference.  The team is now surrounding the system with lightweight wire coils in the open environment to compensate the Earth’s magnetic field.  A field compensation system will soon eradicate invading magnetic field signals.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH NYC 2015 – JUNE 30 @ NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. REGISTER HERE.

Cheap, remote, smartphone molecular cancer diagnosis

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A Harvard and Mass General developed device may bring rapid, accurate molecular diagnosis of cancer and other diseases to remote locations.  The smartphone-based device creates holograms to collect detailed microscopic images for digital analysis of the molecular composition of cells and tissues.

The study’s authors believe that “because the system is compact, easy to operate, and readily integrated with a smartphone, this approach could enable medical diagnostics in geographically and/or socioeconomically limited settings with pathology bottlenecks.”

The D3 (digital diffraction diagnosis) system features an imaging module with a battery-powered LED light clipped onto a standard smartphone. It records high-resolution imaging data with its camera.

With a much greater field of view than traditional microscopy, the system can record data on 100,000 cells from a blood or tissue sample in a single image. The data is transmitted for analysis to a remote server via the cloud. Results are returned to the point of care.

For molecular analysis of tumors, a sample of blood or tissue is labeled with microbeads that bind to known cancer-related molecules. The sample is loaded into the D3 imaging module. After the image is recorded and data transmitted, the presence of specific molecules is detected by analyzing diffraction patterns generated by the microbeads.

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC 2015 – June 30 @ The New York Academy of Sciences

Big Data, AI and personalized healthcare

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With the goal of personalizing healthcare, improving outcomes and cutting costs, IBM’s Watson Health will aggregate massive amounts of disparate patient data.  The company has struck deals with Apple, Johnson & Johnson and Medtronic to collect and use more information from devices.

To address privacy concerns, IBM is offering ways to strip personal information from wearables and plug that information into Watson to look for aggregate trends. Its health cloud will  be able to de-anonymize information when needed for doctors to see how to apply a patient’s specific health information to their care.

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC 2015 – June 30 @ The New York Academy of Sciences