All posts by lisaweiner

AI used to study brain blood flow ties to Schizophrenia

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Mina Gheiratmand,  Serdar Dursun, and University of Alberta colleagues used IBM AI tools to try to  identify schizophrenic traits based on a person’s brain blood flow.

95 participant  fMRI images of schizophrenia-diagnosed and healthy patient brains were analyzed.  The researchers claimed to accurately diagnose patients, based on blood flow, 74% of the time. They also claimed to be able to measure the severity of symptoms.

A much larger sample size will be required to determine the validity of this approach to understanding a disease that so little is known about.  ApplySci applauds this perhaps promising attempt.

Sensor detects asthma, cancer, diabetes in breath

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KAIST professor Il-doo Kim 김일두 has developed a sensor that can diagnose diseases by measuring the concentration change of the specific gases in the breath, with out blood or imaging tests. Animal protein is used as a catalyst.  The researchers claim that detection can be done at the time of disease metabolism, enabling early diagnosis.

Hydrogen, acetone, toluene, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen monoxide, and moisture are biomarker gases are emitted at high concentrations in patients with  diseases such as asthma, lung cancer, and Type 1 diabetes.  The 16 sensor array system recognizes human fingerprints and individual breathing patterns associated  with each condition.

Technion professor Hossam Haick has been studying non-invasive breath-based detection of disease, including cancer, since 2007, and his Na-Nose technology was commercialized in 2013.

Click to view Il-Doo Kim discussing breath-based disease detection.

Click to view Hossam Haick discussing breath-based disease detection.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Hypoallergenic, continuous, week-long health wearable

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University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya has developed a hypoallergenic, adhesive, continuous health sensor. The device can be worn comfortably for a week because of its nanoscal mesh elastic electrodes.  This allows the skin to breathe, preventing inflammation.

The electrodes contains a  biologically compatible,  water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and a gold layer. The wearable  is applied by spraying a tiny amount of water, which dissolves the PVA nanofibers, and allows it to stick easily to the skin. It conforms to curvilinear surfaces of human skin, such as sweat pores and the ridges of an index finger’s fingerprint pattern.

A study of 20 subjects wearing the device showed that  electrical activity of muscles were comparable to those obtained through conventional gel electrodes.  There was no inflammation after one week, and repeated bending and stretching did not cause damage, making this a potentially disruptive method to monitor health and performance.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Direct brain path for sight, sound via implanted microscope

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Rice University’s Jacob Robinson, with Yale and Columbia colleagues, are developing FlatScope — a flat, brain implanted microscope that monitors and triggers neurons which are modified to be fluorescent when active.

While capturing greater detail than current brain probes, the microscope also goes through deep levels that illustrate  sensory input processing — which they hope to be able to control.

Aiming to produce a super high-resolution neural interface, FlatScope is a part of  DARPA’s NESD program, founded by Phillip Alvelda, and now led by Brad Ringeisen.


Phillip Alvelda will be a featured speaker at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston conference on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab.  Other speakers include:  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar  – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

AI driven, music-triggered brain state therapy for pain, sleep, stress, gait

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The Sync Project has developed a novel, music-based, non-pharmaceutical approach to treating pain, sleep, stress, and Parkinson’s gait issues.

Recent studies showed Parkinson’s patients improved their gait when listening to a song with the right beat pattern, and post surgery patients used 1/3 the amount of self-administered morphine after listening to an hour of music.

Lifestyle applications include Unwind, an app detects ones heartbeat, and responds with relaxing music (customized by machine learning tools) to aid sleep, and the Sync Music Bot, which uses Spotify to deliver daily music to enhance work, relaxation, and exercise.

With further clinical validation, this non-invasive therapy could replace drugs for better, targeted, personalized interventions.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 14th

Algorithm-adjusted exoskeleton enables movement optimization, personalization

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Juanjuan Zhang, Steven Collins and CMU colleagues have developed an algorithm that enables ankle exoskeletons to adapt to the wearer’s walk called “Human in the Loop Optimization.”

In a recent study, by using indirect calorimetry to measure metabolic rates, torque was adjusted while users were walking, running, and carrying a load.

At this stage, a treadmill and extensive monitoring equipment are required.  The goal is for users to be fitted in a clinic, and walk away with a programmed profile.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 7th

 

Thin, flexible, adhesive, continuous, cuffless blood pressure sensor

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Zhao Ni and Yuan-ting Zhang of the Chinese University of Hong Kong have developed an ultra-thin, waterproof, cuffless blood pressure  sensor that can be worn on the wrist, woven into clothes or bed sheets, or integrated into an earpiece. The monitor detects blood flow and monitors  health data through color reflected by skin and image depth. It provides continuous, wireless monitoring and abnormality alerts.

Professor Zhao believes that in the future, the sensor could use AI to improve itself.  She intends to  broaden its applications to include monitoring breathing rate and blood oxygen level, to also replace a finger -worn pulse oximeter. 


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 23rd

 

Sensor-embedded respiration, feeding tubes in the ICU

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Art Medical‘s sensor-embedded feeding and respiratory  tubes provide continuous measurement of gastric reflux and, saliva. These secretions, currently measured manually in the ICU, can cause aspiration pneumonia and ventilator associated pneumonia, which can prolong hospital stays, or cause death.  Urine output is also measured, in an attempt to prevent kidney failure.

The company’s digestive, respiratory, and urinary sensors gather data in real time, which is processed in the cloud, and sent to the medical team automatically for immediate treatment.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 23rd.

 

 

Adhesive patch + nose wearable detect sleep apnea

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Somnarus has developed a disposable, adhesive patch that detects obstructive sleep apnea at home.

The SomnaPatch is worn on the forehead, wth an addtional piece on the nose. It records nasal pressure, blood oxygen saturation, pulse rate, respiratory effort, body position and how long a patient is asleep.

An 174-patient study showed that results from the SomnaPatch matched standard in-lab polysomnography 87% of the time.

If the device is proven effective in larger studies, it could be a cheaper, more comfortable alternative to lab-based sleep studies.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 9th.

BCI-controlled exoskeleton helps motor recovery in stroke

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Ipsihand, developed by Eric Leuthardt and Washington University colleagues, is a brain controlled glove that helps reroute hand control to an undamaged part of the brain.  The system uses a glove or brace on the hand, an EEG cap, and an amplifier.

One’s hands are controlled by the opposite side of the brain. If one hemisphere is damaged, it is difficult to control the other hand.

According to Leuthard, the idea of Ipsihand is that if one can “couple those motor signals that are associated with moving the same-sided limb with the actual movements of the hand, new connections will be made in your brain that allow the uninjured areas of your brain to take over control of the paralyzed hand.”

Ipsihand’s cap detects intention signals to open or close the hand, then the computer amplifies them. The brace then opens or closes in a pincer-like grip with the hand inside, bending the fingers and thumb to meet.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary