Headset-free mixed reality

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Disney Research’s Magic Bench is a mixed-reality technology that lets multiple users interact with animated characters, with out headsets or handheld devices.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, August 4th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Fractal-shaped electrodes could improve retinal implants

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William Watterson and Richard Taylor an the  University of Oregon are in the early stages of developing fractal-shaped electrodes for use as retinal implants to restore sight.  They believe that the square shape of previous generations of electrodes prevented their success.  (86 per cent fail.) The fractal shape mimics the design of the neurons they interact with.

In simulations, the fractal design stimulated 90 per cent more neurons in the retina, while using less voltage than a traditional implant.

The team is working on shrinking the implants before they are tested on mice — therefore the possibility of human use is far off and not guaranteed — but the concept is promising.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 28th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Alzheimer’s diagnosis disputed in up to 50% of PET study subjects

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James Hendrix and Alzheimer’s Association colleagues are conducting a study to see how PET scans could change the nature of Alzheimer’s diagnosis and treatment.

4,000 of 18,000 subjects have been tested to date, with a stunning result showing that a significant portion of people with mild cognitive impairment or dementia who are taking medication for Alzheimer’s may not actually have the disease.

The PET scan determines if  MCI or dementia  patient brains contain the amyloid plaques that are one of the two hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease. Among the 4,000 people tested, 54.3 percent of MCI patients and 70.5 percent of dementia patients had the plaques. A positive test for amyloid does not mean someone has Alzheimer’s disease, though their presence is thought to precede the disease and increase the risk of progression. A negative test means a person does not have the disease.

After seeing the PET imaging results, doctors changed their care plans for two-thirds of the patients in the study. According to Hendrix, “We thought we would be able to see about a 30 percent change, but we’re getting a 66 percent change, so it’s huge. We see high percentages of people who are on a drug and didn’t need to be on those drugs.”


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 28th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY

 

Sensor glove translates sign language, mimics gestures

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UCSD’s Timothy O’Connor and Darren Lipomi have developed  The Language of Glove — glove that wirelessly translates American Sign Language into text, and controls a virtual hand to mimic sign language gestures. It was built for less than $100 using stretchable and printable electronics.

Nine silicon-based polymer sensors, with a conductive carbon paint, were taped to the back and knuckles of a leather glove.  They  were secured with copper tape, and stainless steel thread connected them to a low power, custom-printed circuit board, at the back of the wrist.

The sensors changed their electrical resistance when stretched or bent. This allowed them to code different letters of the American Sign Language alphabet, based on the positions of all nine knuckles. The circuit board converted the  code into letters, and transmitted the signals via Bluetooth to a  phone or computer.

The team is investigating other uses for the glove, including VR, AR, telesurgery, technical training, and defense. The next version  is intended to have a sense of touch.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 28th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY

AI used to study brain blood flow ties to Schizophrenia

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Mina Gheiratmand,  Serdar Dursun, and University of Alberta colleagues used IBM AI tools to try to  identify schizophrenic traits based on a person’s brain blood flow.

95 participant  fMRI images of schizophrenia-diagnosed and healthy patient brains were analyzed.  The researchers claimed to accurately diagnose patients, based on blood flow, 74% of the time. They also claimed to be able to measure the severity of symptoms.

A much larger sample size will be required to determine the validity of this approach to understanding a disease that so little is known about.  ApplySci applauds this perhaps promising attempt.

Sensor detects asthma, cancer, diabetes in breath

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KAIST professor Il-doo Kim 김일두 has developed a sensor that can diagnose diseases by measuring the concentration change of the specific gases in the breath, with out blood or imaging tests. Animal protein is used as a catalyst.  The researchers claim that detection can be done at the time of disease metabolism, enabling early diagnosis.

Hydrogen, acetone, toluene, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen monoxide, and moisture are biomarker gases are emitted at high concentrations in patients with  diseases such as asthma, lung cancer, and Type 1 diabetes.  The 16 sensor array system recognizes human fingerprints and individual breathing patterns associated  with each condition.

Technion professor Hossam Haick has been studying non-invasive breath-based detection of disease, including cancer, since 2007, and his Na-Nose technology was commercialized in 2013.

Click to view Il-Doo Kim discussing breath-based disease detection.

Click to view Hossam Haick discussing breath-based disease detection.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Hypoallergenic, continuous, week-long health wearable

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University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya has developed a hypoallergenic, adhesive, continuous health sensor. The device can be worn comfortably for a week because of its nanoscal mesh elastic electrodes.  This allows the skin to breathe, preventing inflammation.

The electrodes contains a  biologically compatible,  water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and a gold layer. The wearable  is applied by spraying a tiny amount of water, which dissolves the PVA nanofibers, and allows it to stick easily to the skin. It conforms to curvilinear surfaces of human skin, such as sweat pores and the ridges of an index finger’s fingerprint pattern.

A study of 20 subjects wearing the device showed that  electrical activity of muscles were comparable to those obtained through conventional gel electrodes.  There was no inflammation after one week, and repeated bending and stretching did not cause damage, making this a potentially disruptive method to monitor health and performance.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Direct brain path for sight, sound via implanted microscope

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Rice University’s Jacob Robinson, with Yale and Columbia colleagues, are developing FlatScope — a flat, brain implanted microscope that monitors and triggers neurons which are modified to be fluorescent when active.

While capturing greater detail than current brain probes, the microscope also goes through deep levels that illustrate  sensory input processing — which they hope to be able to control.

Aiming to produce a super high-resolution neural interface, FlatScope is a part of  DARPA’s NESD program, founded by Phillip Alvelda, and now led by Brad Ringeisen.


Phillip Alvelda will be a featured speaker at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston conference on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab.  Other speakers include:  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar  – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

AI driven, music-triggered brain state therapy for pain, sleep, stress, gait

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The Sync Project has developed a novel, music-based, non-pharmaceutical approach to treating pain, sleep, stress, and Parkinson’s gait issues.

Recent studies showed Parkinson’s patients improved their gait when listening to a song with the right beat pattern, and post surgery patients used 1/3 the amount of self-administered morphine after listening to an hour of music.

Lifestyle applications include Unwind, an app detects ones heartbeat, and responds with relaxing music (customized by machine learning tools) to aid sleep, and the Sync Music Bot, which uses Spotify to deliver daily music to enhance work, relaxation, and exercise.

With further clinical validation, this non-invasive therapy could replace drugs for better, targeted, personalized interventions.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 14th

Algorithm-adjusted exoskeleton enables movement optimization, personalization

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Juanjuan Zhang, Steven Collins and CMU colleagues have developed an algorithm that enables ankle exoskeletons to adapt to the wearer’s walk called “Human in the Loop Optimization.”

In a recent study, by using indirect calorimetry to measure metabolic rates, torque was adjusted while users were walking, running, and carrying a load.

At this stage, a treadmill and extensive monitoring equipment are required.  The goal is for users to be fitted in a clinic, and walk away with a programmed profile.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 7th