Tiny sensor monitors the heart, recognizes speech, enables human-machine interfaces

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Northwestern professor John Rogers has released a paper detailing his latest tiny, wearable, flexible, highly accurate health sensor, which monitors the heart, recognizes speech, and can enable human-machine interfaces.  Professor Yonggang Huang is the corresponding author.

The soft, continuous monitor adheres to any part of the body, detecting mechanical waves that propagate through tissues and fluids in physiological activity — revealing acoustical signatures of individual events.  These include the opening and closing of heart valves, vocal cord vibration, and gastrointestinal tract movement.  ECG and EMG  electrodes can also be integrated.

Obvious practical applications include remote health monitoring, enabling seniors to age in place, and battlefield health and robot/drone control.  The vocal cord monitoring feature could also be used to assist the disabled communicate or control a keyboard.

ApplySci is honored to include Professor Rogers as a keynote speaker at Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley, on February 7-8, 2017, at Stanford University.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Registration rates increase today, November 18, 2016

 

 

Implanted device enables slow, but more reliable, brain-driven typing

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UMC Utrecht professor Nick Ramsey has developed an implantable brain computer interface that allowed a locked-in ALS patient to (very slowly) translate her thoughts into text.

Until recently, the patient used eye tracking to spell words on a computer screen, as many ALS patients do.  However, as 1/3 of patients lose the ability to control their eyes, scientists have been looking for thought controlled alternatives, both invasive, implant-driven, and non invasive, EEG-driven.

The success of this implant, while it only allows the user to “type” 2 letters per minute, is that it does not require the constant calibration of earlier devices, which required them to be used in the lab, or were unreliable.

Ramsey simplified the process by focusing on detecting only brain signals that fire when the brain counts backwards and commands the body to click a mouse.

Click to view UMC Utrecht video


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Voice analysis as a diagnostic tool

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Beyond Verbal recently used its emotion-detecting voice analysis app in an attempt to predict coronary artery disease in 150 study participants, 120 of whom had presented for angiography.  The company claims to have identified 13 voice features  associated with CAD – and one associated with a 19-fold increase in its likelihood.

The researchers said that the voice indicator was strongest when a subject described a negative experience.  As this suggests an emotional connection to heart disease, could a neurotech wearable, that provides brain activity analysis, validate the process?  The company is already studying voice changes in Autism and Parkinson’s disease, but this was the first time they used their voice diagnostic tool in a non-brain disease study.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Registration rates increase Friday, November 18th

Science, not walls.

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Reactionary politics must not deter our focus. On the future. On science. On technology. On healthcare. On progress. On our shared humanity.

It is my honor to gather the brilliant, for interdisciplinary exchanges about improving health, treating disease, and assisting the disabled. About enhancing life.  At our Digital Health + NeuroTech conferences at  Stanford and MIT.

Thank you to our speakers:  Phillip Alvelda, Zhenan Bao, Eythor Bender, Sky Christopherson, Casper de Clercq, Karl Deisseroth, Shahin Farshchi, Roozbeh Ghaffari, Tom Insel, Nathan Intrator, Mary Lou Jepsen, Vinod Khosla, Miguel Nicolelis, John Rogers, Krishna Shenoy, Unity Stoakes, Tarun Wadhwa, Vivek Wadhwa, and Mounir Zok.

You are the bright lights of our future.

Lisa Weiner Intrator, November 9, 2016

Virtual visits, digital second opinions, remote urgent care at NYC hospital system

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NYP OnDemand is the system-wide telemedicine platform of NY Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia Doctors and Weill Cornell Medicine.  It includes virtual visits, digital second opinions, remote access to urgent care (for non life-threatening issues), and the ability for doctors to collaborate on patient cases.

Faster care and less crowded hospitals can of course improve the quality of life for New Yorkers. But in rural America and the developing world, similar systems could dramatically increase access to physicians.

Health technology as an equalizer in care, irrespective of wealth and location, will be a focus of the Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley conference at Stanford University this February.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Neurofeedback to suppress delta frequencies in autism

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Mente is a neurofeedback system for autistic kids that creates personalized binaural beats, to suppress excessive delta frequencies, using auditory pathways in the brain.

Delta waves are typically associated with sleep and closed eyes, but autistic people experience high delta wave frequencies while awake. This  could be attributed to a feeling of isolation.

The company claims that Mente training should begin between ages 3 and 12, and that positive effects can be seen after 4 to 8 weeks of daily 40-minute  sessions.  The goal is enhanced concentration and communication.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Curated, enterprise-wide, health app prescription system

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Mount Sinai Health System (with 7,100 physicians) has launched RxUniverse, an enterprise wide, curated app prescription system. Included apps have have been evaluated based on published evidence, to help physicians utilize digital health solutions, with an increased level of safety.

A pilot platform was launched throughout five clinical areas at Mount Sinai earlier this year.  Physicians have since prescribed 2,000 apps.  Their startup company, Responsive Health,  will license RxUniverse to other health systems.

RxUniverse was developed in the Sinai App Lab, under the direction of Ashish Atreja.  Integrating the latest consumer medical and lifestyle apps throughout such an enormous system is no easy task — and ApplySci applauds Mt Sinai for its vision of delivering healthcare in an integrated, efficient, vetted, and patient-friendly manner.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Fully transparent, glucose monitoring contact lens

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Oregon State’s Greg Herman has developed a transparent sensor to monitor glucose (via tears) in a contact lens.  The device could also be used to control insulin infusions, by transmitting real-time data to a pump.

Similar technology has been developed by Google, although their lens is not (currently) fully transparent, and Noviosense, which requires a user to insert a device in the lower lid.

Herman believes that the lens sensor could also be used to monitor stress hormones, uric acid, and  ocular pressure in glaucoma.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

Non-invasive tear sensor continuously monitors glucose

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Noviosense is a flexible sensor glucose monitor, worn in a lower eyelid. The wireless, battery-free wearable tracks glucose levels in tears, and continuously sends measurements to one’s phone.

One of three electrodes is coated with an immobilized enzyme, which converts glucose into gluconic acid, leaving the co-enzyme FAD reduced to FADH. An  oxygen molecule oxidizes the co-factor and produces a short lived molecule of hydrogen peroxide, that is converted on the electrode surface to water. This results in an electric current, measured using the other two electrodes. The electrical signal is then converted into a radio frequency signal, transmitted via antenna.

It is possible to connect the sensor to an insulin pump, creating a closed loop system.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth

REGISTRATION FEE INCREASES ON NOVEMBER 1, 2016

Eye tracking + VR to improve brain injury diagnosis, track recovery

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Eye tracking technology, combined with VR, is proliferating, with myriad medical, gaming, and education applications.

SyncThink uses eye tracking, built into an Oculus Rift,  to detect if a person has the ability to keep

the eyes synced with moving objects, to determine brain injury and track recovery.

The company has been granted 10 patents, for  eye-tracking hardware, and analytical techniques for stimulating, measuring, and training brain attention networks. It has been used to detect concussions on the field and evaluate soldier readiness and brain impairment after injury. The company describes additional applications including characterizing and monitoring fatigue, performance, and developmental or neurodegenerative conditions.

Eyefluence, which was today acquired by Google, creates head-mounted display AR, VR, and mixed reality interfaces. According to the company,  its AR application allows critical care professionals to access patient data with their eyes while their hands treat the injured.  VR integrations humanize experiences, reduce nausea, optimize image resolution, and increase speed.

ApplySci believes that the next step in AR/VR enhancement is integrating mobile EEG into headsets, combining eye tracking, GSR, and  brainwave data into various applications.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth