Takeda’s digital transformation

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Pharmaceutical giant Takeda is amid a digital transformation — with a patient-centric approach to drug development, wearable device adoption, and sophisticated data analysis.  Leading this effort is Bruno  Villetelle, Takeda’s Chief Digital Officer.  Bruno was a keynote speaker at ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech San Francisco conference, where he discussed digital pharma companions, drawing insights from other industries, creating a culture of innovation, and partnering with entrepreneurs to develop cutting edge technology — culminating in the concept of the patient driving his/her own healthcare  — a message that was echoed throughout the event.

Click to view Bruno Villetelle, and colleague Nicole Mowad-Nassar, interviewed by StartUp Health’s Unity Stoakes at the conference.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel NicolelisRoozbeh GhaffariUnity Stoakes


 

Phone sensors detect anemia, irregular breathing, jaundice

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

University of Washington’s Shwetak Patel and his UbiComp Lab colleagues develop non-invasive, smartphone based tests, meant to bring diagnostics to the masses.

HemaApp,  a smartphone/light  source detection  method for anemia, could be especially  useful in  areas  lacking  access to care.   Anemia is extremely common in poor  countries.

In a recent study, a phone camera was  used measure hemoglobin by capturing light passing through one’s finger. Video was  recorded as light from the flash, plus additional LED lights and an incandescent bulb shined through a fingertip. Changes in color indicated a red  blood cell deficiency.

31 patients were tested, using  this method, at Seattle Children’s Hospital.  The system worked as well  as  a commercial LED anemia  test, but not as well as a standard blood test.

Patel is also  investigating  the use of smartphones to make healthcare  more  accessible in other  ways,  including an app that uses a  microphone to track breathing while sleeping, and a camera  that uses color coded references to detect jaundice in  babies.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis

“Data, not drugs” for elite sport performance

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

With equal parts modesty, enthusiasm, and wearable tech expertise, Olympic cyclist Sky Christopherson came to ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech NYC conference to “thank this community for helping the US Olympic team before the last Olympics with a lot of the same technology to help athletes prepare, using data and not drugs.”

Sky launched OAthlete at the 2012 London Olympics, to develop technology that will allow elite athletes — and the rest of us — to “fine tune” training to “understand how each athlete is responding as a unique individual.”

His mission is to put forth the use of data — not drugs — to enhance performance — healthfully, and sustainably.  Click to view his interview with StartUp Health’s Unity Stoakes at the conference.


ApplySci’s 6th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford  | Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis 

AI speech, text, image, identity analysis for healthcare, self-driving cars

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

The Baidu and Nvidia developed Baidu Brain is a robot that simulates the human brain using advanced algorithms, computing power, and data analysis. It can be used for voice recognition and synthesis, image recognition, natural language processing, and user profiling. Potential healthcare uses include disease recognition, treatment tracking, and rehabilitation progress.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8 @ Stanford University – Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis

 

Antibody dramatically reduces amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s patient study

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

A potential game-changer in the fight against Alzheimer’s Disease has been successfully trialled. Biogen developed aducanumab was found to almost completely clear the visible signs of Alzheimer’s disease from the brain.

165 patient brains were scanned as they were given the drug. After a year, almost all of the amyloid plaques appeared to have disappeared from those given the highest doses.

The findings suggest the plaques at least partly cause the disease, and are not a byproduct.  This has long been debated.

The drug is not with out risk, however.  It caused brain swelling in some patients, who then ledt the trial.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8 @ Stanford University – Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis

Gait sensors predict falls, allowing preventive intervention

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

University of Missouri’s Marjorie Skubic has used sensors to measure gait speed and stride length, to predict falls.  The goals is to use wearables and smart home technology to preserve independence and allow seniors to age in place.

Data was collected at an independent-living style retirement residence. Images and nurse alert emails were generated when irregular motion was detected. The researchers determined that a gait speed decline of 5 centimeters per second was associated with an 86.3 percent probability of falling within three weeks.  A shortened stride length was associated with a 50.6 percent probability of falling within three weeks.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8 @ Stanford University – Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis

Focused brain ultrasound reduces essential tremor

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

 Jeff Elias and University of Virginia  colleagues have used the InSightec focused ultrasound to non-invasively treat essential tremor in a clinical trial.  Participant shaking was noticeably  reduced throughout the 12 month period.

This is the second example this week of a successful, precisely delivered, brain ultrasound study.  (See Ultrasound stimulates thalamus, patient regains consciousness.)

76 participants with moderate to severe essential tremor, for many years, and who did not respond to medications, participated in the study. 75%  received the focused ultrasound treatment, guided by MRI.  25 percent underwent a sham procedure, as a control group. (They were later offered the real procedure.)

Those who received the treatment showed dramatic improvement. Mean tremor scores improved by 47 percent at three months and 40 percent at 12 months. Participants reported major quality of life improvements, and were able to feed themselves, after not being able to before. Those who received the sham procedure showed no significant improvements.

Side effects included gait disturbances and numbness in the hand or face, and were sometimes permanent.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8 @ Stanford University – Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis

Ultrasound stimulates thalamus, patient regains consciousness

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Martin Monti and UCLA colleagues have used sonic stimulation to excite thalamus neurons,  enabling a patient to recover from a coma, non-invasively.

Previously, deep brain stimulation, which carries significant risk, as electrodes are implanted inside thalamus, was the only way to attempt to achieve this.

The thalamus  was targeted with a low-intensity focused ultrasound, creating a sphere of acoustic energy, aimed at different brain regions to excite tissue.  The low-energy device was activated next to the patient’s head for 30 seconds, 10 times, in 10 minutes.

Before the procedure, the patient showed minimal signs of being conscious and of understanding speech. He could perform limited movements when asked.

His responses grew measurably the day after the treatment.  After 3 days, he regained full consciousness and full language comprehension.  He was able to communicate by nodding his head “yes” or shaking his head “no.” He made a fist-bump gesture to say goodbye to a doctor.

Professor Paul Vespa will test the procedure on several patients at the David Geffen School of Medicine this fall.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8 @ Stanford University – Featuring:   Vinod KhoslaTom InselZhenan BaoPhillip Alvelda – Nathan IntratorJohn RogersMary Lou JepsenVivek WadhwaMiguel Nicolelis

Wheelchair allows quadriplegics to stand, navigate various surfaces

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

UPnRIDE is a wheelchair that brings quadriplegics from a sitting to an upright position — allowing them to stand and be mobile. A user’s center of gravity stays in the middle of the auto-balancing device, allowing it to remain stable once one is standing. The multi-function wheelchair can negotiate various types of  surfaces, sidewalks and slopes.

It was developed by Amit Goffer, creator of the ReWalk robotic exoskeleton.  ReWalk, which allows users to walk and climb stairs, requires the use of the upper body, to hold crutches.  UPnRIDE can be used by those paralyzed from the neck down.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8, 2017 @ Stanford University

Nanorobots optimize cancer drug delivery, preserve surrounding tissues

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Sylvain Martel and Polytechnique Montréal and McGill University colleagues have developed nanorobotic agents that can specifically target active cancerous cells of tumors.  Optimal targeting  could help preserve surrounding organs and healthy tissues, and allow reduced dosage.

The nanorobotic agents can autonomously detect oxygen-depleted tumour areas, and deliver the drug to them. These “hypoxic” zones are often resistant to therapies.

According to professor Martel:  “This innovative use of nanotransporters will have an impact not only on creating more advanced engineering concepts and original intervention methods, but it also throws the door wide open to the synthesis of new vehicles for therapeutic, imaging and diagnostic agents. Chemotherapy, which is so toxic for the entire human body, could make use of these natural nanorobots to move drugs directly to the targeted area, eliminating the harmful side effects while also boosting its therapeutic effectiveness.”


Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8, 2017 @ Stanford University